Overtly Still

An apt description of Dennis Michalak

colleendoran:

Another panel from the book I am drawing for Neil Gaiman. Featuring badgers.

And a picture of Neil Gaiman from the BBC. As a badger.

This is a coincidence.

(via neil-gaiman)

Why Heterosexuality Didn't Really Exist Until the 19th Century

medievalpoc:

The history of straightness is much shorter than you’d think. An expert explains its origins.

Blank mentions her personal story at the beginning of her provocative new history of heterosexuality,  “Straight,” as a way of illustrating just how artificial our notions of “straightness” really are. In her book, Blank, a writer and historian who has written extensively about sexuality and culture, looks at the ways in which social trends and the rise of psychiatry conspired to create this new category in the late 19th and early 20th century. Along the way, she examines the changing definition of marriage, which evolved from a businesslike agreement into a romantic union centered on love, and how social Darwinist ideas shaped the divisions between gay and straight. With her eye-opening book, Blank tactfully deconstructs a facet of modern sexuality that most of us take for granted…

This intersects in some really interesting ways with art history, gender, and race. I like how the book’s premise is framed, as a sort of inverted look into History via queer studies.

(Source: rhamphotheca)

wordsandchocolate:

I made a slideshow about how to create a fictional character… I got most of the information from the ‘start writing fiction’ (free) course on the OpenUniversity website and found it incredibly useful so here’s a visual version for you :)

Fun stuff.

(via medievalpoc)

Mancoward

kurtbraunohler:

Last week I did the Mancow morning radio show in Chicago.

It did not go well.

As a comic, I’ve done a lot of morning radio. It’s the main press for most Midwest clubs. Never have I had an experience like the one I just had.

Everybody is familiar with the Morning Zoo stereotype – the sound…

interweber:

pineapplefiendwillriseagain:

This is my little baby cousin and he is dressed as a smoke detector for Halloween
None of us know why but he is really obsessed with smoke detectors
That’s all he’s asked for in the way of presents these past two years
He calls them “snoke edectors”
Also he has a scrapbook of everyone in the family posing with their smoke detectors
the end

omg

interweber:

pineapplefiendwillriseagain:

This is my little baby cousin and he is dressed as a smoke detector for Halloween

None of us know why but he is really obsessed with smoke detectors

That’s all he’s asked for in the way of presents these past two years

He calls them “snoke edectors”

Also he has a scrapbook of everyone in the family posing with their smoke detectors

the end

omg

(via daveshumka)

I’ve said this a million times: there should be no limitations on comedy. Anything you wanna fucking do - do. But it should be “why do you want to?” When you learn someone’s story, you might not want to. You still can, but you might not want to. If you really learn what a transgendered person goes through, how scary it is, and how brave they are - you might go “you know, I might wanna make fun of the people that make fun of them.”

Todd Glass, CBB 290 (via dancingwithleland)

Total reblog.

(via jenkirkman)

(via jenkirkman)

liartownusa:

The Legend of Diaper Horse by Cassandra Twobears

liartownusa:

The Legend of Diaper Horse by Cassandra Twobears

humansofnewyork:

"I’m trying to succeed in real estate without being a douchebag."

humansofnewyork:

"I’m trying to succeed in real estate without being a douchebag."

humansofnewyork:

"I came over with a student visa. I wanted to study computers, but I couldn’t enroll in school until I could prove that I had money to pay the tuition. The first three weeks I slept on trains. I kept asking people where I could find the Senegalese community. Eventually I met a person who told me to go to Harlem because there was an African community there. In Harlem, I found an association for Senegalese people. And they had places to stay for people who were new. I did restaurant and cleaning jobs for a couple of years. Eventually I met my wife and became a citizen. And now I have a security job, so I can finally enroll in school."

humansofnewyork:

"I came over with a student visa. I wanted to study computers, but I couldn’t enroll in school until I could prove that I had money to pay the tuition. The first three weeks I slept on trains. I kept asking people where I could find the Senegalese community. Eventually I met a person who told me to go to Harlem because there was an African community there. In Harlem, I found an association for Senegalese people. And they had places to stay for people who were new. I did restaurant and cleaning jobs for a couple of years. Eventually I met my wife and became a citizen. And now I have a security job, so I can finally enroll in school."

humansofnewyork:

"Saddest moment? How am I supposed to choose between losing my parents and seeing my friends die in Vietnam? I don’t categorize those things. Listen, a person is like a rubber band ball. We’ve all got a lot of bad rubber bands, and a lot of good rubber bands, and they’re all wrapped up together. And you’ve got to have both types of bands or your rubber band ball ain’t gonna bounce. And no use trying to untangle them. You know what I’m saying?"

humansofnewyork:

"Saddest moment? How am I supposed to choose between losing my parents and seeing my friends die in Vietnam? I don’t categorize those things. Listen, a person is like a rubber band ball. We’ve all got a lot of bad rubber bands, and a lot of good rubber bands, and they’re all wrapped up together. And you’ve got to have both types of bands or your rubber band ball ain’t gonna bounce. And no use trying to untangle them. You know what I’m saying?"

humansofnewyork:

"One day a crazy looking homeless guy came to the door, and we were about to close the door on him, but my mother saw him and shouted: ‘Hey Eugene!’ She knew his name! Then she ran around the kitchen putting all sorts of food into tupperware, and brought it out to him. After he left, we asked my mom why she gave him so much food. She told us: ‘You never know how Jesus is going to look when he shows up.’ She was always saying that— it was a spiritual thing. Then you know what happened? Two months later, that same man showed up on the door step, clean shaven, and wearing a suit. And he had an envelope with money for my mother. ‘Ms. Rosa always believed in me,’ he said. I’ll never forget it! Eugene was his name."

humansofnewyork:

"One day a crazy looking homeless guy came to the door, and we were about to close the door on him, but my mother saw him and shouted: ‘Hey Eugene!’ She knew his name! Then she ran around the kitchen putting all sorts of food into tupperware, and brought it out to him. After he left, we asked my mom why she gave him so much food. She told us: ‘You never know how Jesus is going to look when he shows up.’ She was always saying that— it was a spiritual thing. Then you know what happened? Two months later, that same man showed up on the door step, clean shaven, and wearing a suit. And he had an envelope with money for my mother. ‘Ms. Rosa always believed in me,’ he said. I’ll never forget it! Eugene was his name."